Posts tagged "substance use"

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3 Ways to Support a Loved One in Recovery

May 2nd, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction, Recover 0 comments on “3 Ways to Support a Loved One in Recovery”

Addiction is a complex disease. The disease of addiction affects both the addicted, and those that are close to the addicted. The stigma of addiction can make it very difficult to ask for help. One who is battling addiction can feel ashamed, guilty, alone, and worthless. Supporting and encouraging your loved one’s sobriety will help in his or her recovery.

3 Ways to Help Loved Ones in Recovery

Below are three quick tips for helping a loved one’s recovery as much as possible without enabling him towards a relapse. It is always good to practice what is referred to as “tough love.” Chances are if you are helping someone, you love that person. Just be advised that feelings and emotions can get in the way of distinguishing the fine line between helping and enabling an addict. Read our three ways and try to determine where that line is for you and your loved one.

1. Learn more about addiction.

     Listen to people in group meetings share their personal experiences with addiction.

2. Attend a support group with your loved one.

     This will show your loved one that you care and you can talk with others in similar situations and learn how to cope.

3. Connect with others in the group.

     New, sober friendships can develop through group meetings. Build a network of people who understand addiction.

Always remember to praise your loved one’s sobriety, while encouraging them to stay sober. Recovery is a life-long process and your loved one will be faced with challenges. Supporting a loved one in recovery requires a lot of love, reinforcement, and motivation. If you or a loved one is battling addiction, do not wait. Addiction is a deadly and baffling disease. If you feel that a loved one is using, it is time that you seek professional help. Addiction is very much treatable and recovery is definitely possible!

supporting someone in recovery infographic by Serenity Springs Recovery Center
How to Support Someone in Addiction Recovery

Understanding the Complexity of Addiction

According to an article by Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW for the Hamilton Spectator, “Indicators of success include the person: attending an aftercare program, offering sincere apologies for the impact of the addiction, creating better boundaries regarding friends who may similarly indulge, and being involved in alternate and appropriate activity such as work or recreational pursuits.”

It can be hard for family and friends to understand the complexity of addiction and the intense challenges their loved one faces every day. Addiction hijacks the brain and alters brain chemistry. It interferes with the brain’s neurotransmitters and makes the brain release an increased level of dopamine, which causes euphoric feelings. The brain becomes dependent on the drugs or alcohol to function. A person can experience unpleasant and painful withdrawal symptoms until the drug or alcohol is used again. That is why quitting drugs or alcohol is so difficult.

The Importance of a Good Support System

A positive support system in recovery is crucial and can be very helpful in many ways. Treatment is not “one-size-fits-all” or packaged the same for everyone. It is tailored to the individual’s unique needs. As addicts and alcoholics in recovery, you are surrounded by other addicts and alcoholics on a regular basis. Most of them are those that you network with at meetings or through a treatment program. These are likely to be new relationships because those that you formerly associated with are likely still doing the same things that you are getting away from. This being said, meetings and other social activities can be somewhat or even very uncomfortable or awkward at first.

So it is important to make an addict or alcoholic that is new to the recovery world feel like they have friends and/or loved ones outside of the programs and rooms of recovery. A good family and support system can make all the difference in the world in aiding towards a full recovery from addiction or alcoholism. Sometimes it is nice for an addict to feel a part of something, when they are feeling lost or down. This gives an addict a sense of normalcy and comfort. However, this comfortable feeling will not last long if the addict or alcoholic is not working a program. So, for those of you dealing with addiction, it good to show “tough love” every once in a while. However, it is ultimately on you to figure out the best way to help your loved one.

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The Link Between Verbal Abuse and Addiction

March 18th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “The Link Between Verbal Abuse and Addiction”

“We can all help prevent suicide. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. Call 1-800-273-8255.”

Abuse comes in many forms and sometimes leaves scars we cannot see. Verbal abuse destroys a person’s self-confidence, self-esteem, and self-worth. Threats, rejection, and name-calling are de-humanizing and degrading, and leave the victim feeling alone, isolated, and unworthy. The victim lives in fear of confrontations or arguments. Verbal abuse is a form of emotional abuse and leaves scars that never go away.

A verbally abused person lives with constant self-doubt. The victim constantly wonders what he or she did wrong. In childhood, the victim might be overly shy to avoid conflict or be indecisive when it comes to making decisions later in adulthood. To counteract fear, shame, anger, and other disturbing emotions, the victim might turn to drugs or alcohol to cope. Trauma is often linked to substance abuse and addiction.

In an article on substance abuse for Domestic Shelters (2016), Susan Bernstein, licensed social worker and MA-based therapist who specializes in trauma states, “[some] survivors use drugs or alcohol to dull or numb or block any sort of emotional upheaval that the abuse causes. It becomes their coping mechanism.”

When a person feels hurt and powerless on an emotional level, they are at high risk to use. Verbal abuse can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). According to a study by researchers at the University of Vermont, childhood emotional abuse is linked to opioid abuse in adulthood (2017). Matthew Price, assistant professor in the Department of Psychological Science at the University of Vermont, and the paper’s senior author states, “To protect themselves from strong emotions and from trauma cues that can bring on PTSD symptoms, people with this kind of childhood experience frequently adopt a strategy of avoidance, which can include opioid use.”

Verbal and emotional abuse may have been unavoidable in childhood, but as an adult, you can decide what types of relationships to keep in your life and choose your connections. If you or a loved one is suffering from a mental health condition and addiction, get help now. Treatment is available for a dual diagnosis.   

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

Suicide: The Hidden Risk of Addiction and Mental Health - woman looking sad out rain dropped window - Serenity Springs Recovery

Suicide: The Hidden Risk of Addiction and Mental Health

March 7th, 2019 Posted by Awareness, Blog 0 comments on “Suicide: The Hidden Risk of Addiction and Mental Health”

“We can all help prevent suicide. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).”

It can be difficult for a person who suffers from addiction and mental health issues to ask for help. Tragically, the stigma surrounding addiction and mental health can make a person feel worthless, helpless, and hopeless. Addiction and mental health issues also affect the lives of loved ones.

There is no shame in reaching out when you experience unbearable pain and despair. Suicide is a hidden risk of addiction and mental health. Depression, PTSD, and other trauma-related disorders can lead to suicidal thoughts, which can be amplified with the use of drugs or alcohol. If left untreated, addiction and mental health issues can cause serious health complications or death.

People who appear happy, are wealthy, and in good health are not immune to suicidal thoughts. According to an article by Carolyn C. Ross M.D., M.P.H. for Psychology Today, “Under the influence of drugs or alcohol, people may lose inhibitions and take risks they ordinarily would not. Additionally, many people abuse drugs or alcohol in an attempt to relieve the symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions.” The article also states that substance use disorders can increase the risk of a person dying by suicide. About one in three people who die by suicide are under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

We can all take action to prevent suicide. According to the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, “Evidence shows that providing support services, talking about suicide, reducing access to means of self-harm and following up with loved ones are just some of the actions we can all take to help others.”

Mental illness often coexists with a substance use disorder or addiction. If you or a loved one is struggling with a mental health condition and addiction, get help now. Addiction is isolating, but you are not alone. Get help today so you can live a healthy, fulfilling, sober life in recovery. There is no cure for addiction, but it is treatable.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

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