Posts in Disease of Addiction

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Avoiding Relapse in Addiction Recovery

March 31st, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction, Recover 0 comments on “Avoiding Relapse in Addiction Recovery”

Recovery from addiction is a lifelong process and treatment for addiction varies for each individual based on individual needs. Treatment programs teach clients how to focus on healthy, sober activities as a way to cope with anxiety, stress, depression, or PTSD. The coping mechanisms that you learn in treatment must be used throughout recovery to maintain a new, healthy, sober lifestyle.

There will be challenges throughout recovery that increase the risk of relapse. Avoid situations that heighten the temptation to use your substance of choice. Stay away from people, places, and things that are associated with drug or alcohol use. Call a sober friend or relative who can encourage you to stay sober and talk to you when cravings are intense.

Relapse is not a sign of failure. Addiction changes the way the brain functions, and affects mental and physical health. Lifestyle changes must be made to have success in recovery. The brain needs to be re-trained to function normally without depending on drugs or alcohol. Taking the steps to recovery can be very overwhelming and cravings can be strong.

To avoid relapse, discover new healthy, sober activities or hobbies. Journaling is a great way to help you recognize your success in recovery and identify how you worked through past triggers. Writing also allows you to reflect on positive experiences throughout your journey in recovery. Exercise promotes physical and mental health, and good nutrition is extremely important for your overall health.                                                          

Addiction changes your mind, body, and spirit. Relapse can heighten feelings of worthlessness, self-doubt, and guilt. It can make you feel like giving up. Never give up because of a relapse. Everything about you changes, but you can recover from addiction.

If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction or a substance use disorder, get help now. Do not wait to ask for help. Addiction is incurable, but treatment is available and there is hope in recovery. Take the first step toward a new, rejuvenated, healthy lifestyle in sobriety and get help today.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540.

 

 

The Addicted Brain

The Addicted Brain

March 20th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “The Addicted Brain”

Addiction is a complex brain disease and changes the brain chemically and physiologically. The brain is a vital organ in the human body. It controls how we move, walk, talk, and speak. The brain adapts to environmental changes and allows us to cope with negative emotions, form memories, and learn.

Drugs and alcohol affect the brain’s neurotransmitters, which release an excess level of dopamine causing temporary pleasurable feelings and euphoria. The brain registers all pleasures in a similar way, whether they begin with a psychoactive drug, reward, sexual encounter, or a satisfying meal.

“Repeated exposure to an addictive substance or behavior causes nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex (the area of the brain involved in planning and executing tasks) to communicate in a way that couples liking something with wanting it, in turn driving us to go after it.” (Harvard Medical School, 2011). This prompts us to seek the source of pleasure.

Over time, the brain adapts in a way that actually makes the sought-after substance or activity less pleasurable. Eventually, it becomes increasingly difficult to get the release of more dopamine to feel the same pleasure. This makes a person want more drugs and alcohol with a higher potency, or more risky and addictive activities.  

According to Dr. George Koob, director of NIH’s National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (2015), “The brain actually changes with addiction, and it takes a good deal of work to get it back to its normal state. The more drugs or alcohol you’ve taken, the more disruptive it is to the brain.”

Even if people understand the cycle of addiction and how it changes the brain, they cannot stop on their own. When in treatment, a person’s brain needs to be re-trained to function normally, without toxic substances. It will take time for the brain to re-adjust to a sober, healthy lifestyle.

If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, you are not alone. Get help today so you can enjoy a fulfilling and healthy life in sobriety. There is hope in recovery.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

How Addiction Makes it Difficult to Quit Drugs and Alcohol

How Addiction Makes it Difficult to Quit Drugs and Alcohol

March 19th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “How Addiction Makes it Difficult to Quit Drugs and Alcohol”

Addiction makes it difficult to quit drugs and alcohol, and puts a person at risk of developing serious mental and physical health problems. Drugs and alcohol hijack the brain and change the way the brain works to control a body’s functions. Eventually, the brain becomes dependent on the drugs and alcohol and needs more of the substances to make the individual feel comfortable.

Drug and alcohol use interferes with the brain’s neurotransmitters, which release increased levels of dopamine. This causes the individual to experience pleasurable feelings. Quitting drugs or alcohol alone is not recommended.

Ending drug use alone can cause intense withdrawal symptoms, depending on the type of drug used, duration of use, and the severity of addiction. Some withdrawals from drugs such as heroin will cause flu-like symptoms. The uncomfortable and sometimes painful withdrawals can influence a relapse and increases the risk of overdose or death.

Many people use drugs or alcohol to cope with stress, anxiety, and depression. Drugs and alcohol can increase the symptoms of mental health problems. When drug or alcohol use stops, the person can feel very sick and experience strong cravings. Medication-assisted detox is a safe and more comfortable way of quitting drugs and alcohol. Medical professionals can monitor the detox process and manage medication if needed.

There will be challenges during detox, rehab, and throughout the lifelong recovery process. Support groups and meetings provide a great network of other people recovering from addiction who can give advice and encouragement.

In recovery, an individual needs to learn how to live without substances to cope. People, places, and things associated with drug or alcohol use must be avoided. Meeting people in support groups can lead to new, sober friendships. Strategies for staying away from things that can cause a relapse will help avoid some difficult situations.

If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, get help now. Addiction is isolating, but you are not alone. Make the life-saving decision to get help today.

“The greatest mistake you can make in life is to continually be afraid you will make one.”

~ Elbert Hubbard

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

The Link Between Verbal Abuse and Addiction

The Link Between Verbal Abuse and Addiction

March 18th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “The Link Between Verbal Abuse and Addiction”

“We can all help prevent suicide. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. Call 1-800-273-8255.”

Abuse comes in many forms and sometimes leaves scars we cannot see. Verbal abuse destroys a person’s self-confidence, self-esteem, and self-worth. Threats, rejection, and name-calling are de-humanizing and degrading, and leave the victim feeling alone, isolated, and unworthy. The victim lives in fear of confrontations or arguments. Verbal abuse is a form of emotional abuse and leaves scars that never go away.

A verbally abused person lives with constant self-doubt. The victim constantly wonders what he or she did wrong. In childhood, the victim might be overly shy to avoid conflict or be indecisive when it comes to making decisions later in adulthood. To counteract fear, shame, anger, and other disturbing emotions, the victim might turn to drugs or alcohol to cope. Trauma is often linked to substance abuse and addiction.

In an article on substance abuse for Domestic Shelters (2016), Susan Bernstein, licensed social worker and MA-based therapist who specializes in trauma states, “[some] survivors use drugs or alcohol to dull or numb or block any sort of emotional upheaval that the abuse causes. It becomes their coping mechanism.”

When a person feels hurt and powerless on an emotional level, they are at high risk to use. Verbal abuse can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). According to a study by researchers at the University of Vermont, childhood emotional abuse is linked to opioid abuse in adulthood (2017). Matthew Price, assistant professor in the Department of Psychological Science at the University of Vermont, and the paper’s senior author states, “To protect themselves from strong emotions and from trauma cues that can bring on PTSD symptoms, people with this kind of childhood experience frequently adopt a strategy of avoidance, which can include opioid use.”

Verbal and emotional abuse may have been unavoidable in childhood, but as an adult, you can decide what types of relationships to keep in your life and choose your connections. If you or a loved one is suffering from a mental health condition and addiction, get help now. Treatment is available for a dual diagnosis.   

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

Discovering why Your Loved One is Addicted

Discovering why Your Loved One is Addicted

March 12th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “Discovering why Your Loved One is Addicted”

Addiction does not discriminate. It can happen to anyone from any background, social status, race, and gender. When your loved one is addicted, it can be difficult to understand why he or she developed an addiction. Some people are at higher risk of developing an addiction than others are. There are factors that contribute to a person developing an addiction. Genetics, family history, mental health, and environment are some of the reasons why some people are more susceptible to addiction.

Addiction has an inherited component, often runs in families, and can be passed down through generations. An article on genes and addictions by L. Bevilacqua and D. Goldman for the Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health explains, “Addictions are moderately to highly heritable. Family, adoption, and twin studies reveal that an individual’s risk tends to be proportional to the degree of genetic relationship to an addicted relative.”

Environmental factors can contribute to someone’s substance abuse. Young adolescents who lack parental involvement or live in an abusive home might turn to drugs and alcohol to cope with their emotions. Teens are faced with peer pressure and can easily be influenced to experiment with drugs or alcohol to feel accepted.

Metabolism is another reason why some people develop an addiction. Each person absorbs and processes compounds differently and can determine the effect a drug will have on the body. (Medical News Today (2018).

Mental health conditions such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety can increase the risk of developing an addiction or substance use disorder. Some individuals use drugs or alcohol as a way to cope, but certain substances increase depression and anxiety.

Alcohol is a depressant and increases symptoms of depression. Opioids are often prescribed after an illness, injury, or surgery to temporarily manage pain and recovery. Painkillers are addictive but safe when taken as prescribed. A person without any of the risk factors can also become addicted at any time.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, you are not alone. Addiction is complicated but is treatable. Take the first step toward a healthy, fulfilling, life in sobriety and get help today. There is hope in recovery.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Abuse

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Abuse

March 11th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Abuse”

Benzodiazepines (benzos), such as Xanax are prescribed for those who struggle with anxiety disorders. Benzos are addictive and put a person at risk of developing an addiction. Benzos provide temporary relief from the symptoms of anxiety. Mental health management and therapy are a long-term solution to those who suffer from mental health problems.

People often self-medicate as an immediate fix to cope with stress, anxiety, depression, or other mental health issues. This includes using other drugs or alcohol to cope, which puts a person at risk of developing an addiction.

Although benzos provide an immediate calming effect, more of the medication is needed to replicate that feeling and puts a person at risk of overdose. The combination of tolerance and dependence makes it hard to quit without medical treatment. Just like alcohol, benzos can cause blackouts. A person does not need to be addicted to experience a blackout.

Young people often engage in risky, spontaneous, and harmful behavior. The risk of harmful behavior is increased when young people use benzos. This can include stealing, accidents, and rape. A blackout is anterograde amnesia, and prevents the brain from forming new memories. When a person has a blackout, the risk of it occurring again increases.

Xanax works quickly and is very effective when taken as prescribed. Taking Xanax without a prescription from a medical professional is illegal and dangerous. Fake Xan bars are tablets that look like Xanax but are actually a deadly combination of Xanax and fentanyl, a cheap synthetic opioid that is approximately 100 times more potent than morphine. Rather than risk an overdose or early death, young people need to get help for any underlying mental health conditions with a professional who can offer treatment.

In an article by BIll Melugin (2018) for FOX5, John Clark, chief security office for Pfizer said, “Almost 100 percent of what’s being sold out there is counterfeit.” He also stated, “They’re putting whatever they want into it, fentanyl, boric acid, whatever ingredients are available they’ll put into it and sell it as Xanax, if the intent is to kill kids then they’re doing a good job of it.”

Mental health disorders, such as anxiety, are common and treatable. If you or someone you know is suffering from a mental health condition and substance use disorder or addiction, get help now. Both conditions must be treated as a dual diagnosis for success in recovery.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

Addicted to Crack Cocaine

Addicted to Crack Cocaine

March 8th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “Addicted to Crack Cocaine”

Addiction does not discriminate and can happen to anyone. The risk of a person becoming addicted depends on the drug used, the duration of use, family history, genetics, and mental health. Crack cocaine, also known as crack, is a very addictive substance that is smoked, which causes immediate pleasurable feelings.

A person can become addicted to crack after one use. People who use crack often become engaged in risky, dangerous, and reckless behavior. Crack cocaine use can lead to severe health complications and death. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, (2013), “The effects are quick to be felt, peak quickly, and then end after only 2-20 minutes. Because the high is so short-lived, users often abuse crack in a binges. The binge and crash cycle of use adds to the risk of tolerance, dependence, and addiction.”

When a person is addicted to crack, he or she will experience changes in their physical health, mental health, and behavior. Physical signs of crack addiction include dilated pupils, weight loss, lack of appetite, and deterioration in physical appearance. Behavioral symptoms include lack of interest in activities, a decline in motivation, financial problems, and changes in relationships.

Some psychological signs can occur, such as irritability, aggression, mood changes, and paranoia just to name a few. Crack addiction can lead to financial complications, job loss, personal relationship issues, family problems, and even incarceration.

Behavioral therapies can be used to treat crack addiction. Some offer incentives to reward people for their drug abstinence. For example, the person suffering from addiction receives some type of reward for drug-free tests and reaches goals set by treatment professionals. The incentives are motivational and might include points that accumulate over a short time for a reward.

Other therapies help the patient to recognize potential triggers such as people associated with his or her drug use and places where it was used. Treatment can be tailored to each person’s unique individual needs. Treatment specialists can help identify a plan to help the patient cope, offer suggestions, and develop a plan for ongoing therapy after treatment ends.

Crack is a powerful, deadly drug, but addiction is treatable. If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, get help now. Addiction is isolating, but you are not alone. Get help today so you can enjoy a healthy, fulfilling, sober lifestyle in recovery.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

How to Heal When a Loved One is Addicted

How to Heal When a Loved One is Addicted

March 6th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction 0 comments on “How to Heal When a Loved One is Addicted”

When a loved one is addicted, family and friends are affected. Relationships deteriorate and family members experience emotional stress and agony over their loved one’s addictive behavior. Addiction makes a person limit his or her time around loved ones, which results in long-term absences from special events. Guilt, shame, and low self-esteem are amplified from addiction, which can make your loved one feel isolated.

There are ways to help you heal when a loved one suffers from addiction or a substance use disorder. Learning that addiction is a complex disease is a good way to start. Go to AA or NA meetings and listen to what others say about their experiences with addiction. Meet people in similar circumstances. Join a forum online or a group on social media that relates to drug and alcohol addiction. Ask questions and get advice or suggestions from others.

Encourage your loved one to get help, and stay supportive. Addiction sometimes co-occurs with an underlying mental health issue. Using shameful words or a negative tone could contribute to your loved one continuing his or her harmful drug and alcohol use. Set boundaries to show your loved one what is off limits. Boundaries will teach him or her to respect your rules and space. Plan expectations in advance and follow through with consequences.

Make sure you keep communication open with your loved one and stay positive. Go to group therapy or family counseling together. Family and friends suffer a range of emotions from guilt, anger, frustration, and helplessness. Understand you cannot control your loved one’s behavior.

Addiction affects the individual who suffers from it and family and friends. A person cannot be forced into treatment and recovery, but he or she can be encouraged to get help with love, support, and encouragement from loved ones. If you or a loved one is battling addiction, do not wait to get help. Addiction is isolating, but treatment is available and there is hope in recovery. Do not suffer alone. Get help today to start a healthy life in sobriety.

Serenity Springs Recovery Center focuses on rejuvenating men’s holistic spirit for success in addiction recovery. Our unique dual-diagnosis treatment program with a 12-step completion model helps men change their lives inside and out. Our mission is to provide tools and support for every client’s seamless transition into a meaningful and fulfilling life in sobriety. For information, call (386) 423-4540

2 Drugged Drivers → 3 Deaths and School Bus Crash in NJ

February 21st, 2019 Posted by Disease of Addiction, News, Opioid Epidemic 0 comments on “2 Drugged Drivers → 3 Deaths and School Bus Crash in NJ”

A substitute bus driver, Lisa Byrd drove a school bus and twelve children into a tree after overdosing on heroin. She lost consciousness and the bus from 14th Avenue School in Newark, NJ slowly rolled off the road. According to CNN, she was arrested by the Newark police on Wednesday after being revived by Narcan.

1. School Bus Driver Overdoses, Crashes in NJ
2. Fiery Crash Leaves Three Dead in Wayne, NJ

On Tuesday, Jason Vanderee, a 29-year-old male from Glenwood, NJ crashed his vehicle into a gas station in Wayne, NJ, killing three in a vicious head-on collision. According to northjersey.com, He was high and driving reckless while under the influence of heroin. Again, he was revived with Narcan by local police. Police found 9 bags of heroin in his vehicle, arrested Mr. Vanderee and charged him with 3 counts of death by auto, 3 counts of aggravated manslaughter, and driving while intoxicated.

Drug Overdoses are Dangerous for Everyone

The two stories out of New Jersey occurred over the past few days. This is very frightening to think that these types of drivers are out there and we might have to dodge an oncoming, overdosed driver at some point. However, no one can live there lives like this. Drunk drivers have been on the loose for quite some time now. Please stay alert on the road!!

man opening green beer bottle with bottle opener while driving his car

We are again asking the same question here. Where are we right now in this country in terms of stopping this opioid epidemic? It seems to be doing a bit of a roller coaster routine again and not showing any signs of slowing down. Just when we thought it was cooling off, New Jersey strikes again.

Will the opioid epidemic slow down?

Stories like the aforementioned will put knots in your stomach or fear in your hearts. We are in a scary place as Americans for a number of reasons, but we are not going to get into politics. In terms of addiction and the epidemic, there is no clear cut answer. Obviously, as citizens or human beings, we wish these stories and epidemic would disappear for good.

The truth is drugs are here to stay and we have to hope that scientists continue to improve methods for combating the disease of addiction like our amino acid therapy or the bridge device. All we can do is continue to live our lives, focusing on our goals one day at a time. Writing this actually brought on some déjà vu from this blog post below where we asked very similar questions, and the results have not changed much!

An excerpt from, “Fentanyl Epidemic: Week in Review,” posted 10/16/2017:

What can we do to stop this?

As of today, there is really no answer for why, when or how this epidemic is going to end. It seems that drugs will always be a problem in this country and throughout the world regardless of the efforts made by police, armed forces, government, citizens, etc. of any country. At Serenity Springs Recovery Center, we do not worry about the numbers or politics involved, even though these are hot topics in America. We are here to offer a solution for addiction and change the lives of suffering addicts and alcoholics. These changes come from the knowledge and spiritual principles that we instill into their daily lives. This can and will happen for all that thoroughly work our program of recovery.

stop sign with trees in background

Recovery from Addiction is Possible

Not good when we are coming to the same conclusion from 16 months ago. However, we will keep fighting this thing from our corner, here in Volusia County, FL. We have seen many recover and will continue to recover opioid addicts, alcoholics, meth addicts, benzo addicts, we have even seen a few internet/pornography addicts recover at Serenity Springs. It is on the individual, if they want it, the solution is waiting for them and will always be available to those that seek freedom from addiction!

Know an opioid addict?

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Addicted to opioids?

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MY BOYFRIEND, HIS ADDICTION, AND ME blog post header couple on brick wall

My Boyfriend, His Addiction, and Me

February 8th, 2019 Posted by Blog, Disease of Addiction, Opioid Epidemic, Recover, Treatment 0 comments on “My Boyfriend, His Addiction, and Me”

This is a story of a different experience of addiction, his addiction that became our addiction. Fortunately, I am not an addict or an alcoholic. I am considered by most to be a “good girl,” raised with values and morals in my very close family in the Philippines. I was the baby of four sisters and when I finally made it to America at age fifteen. It was here in the States that I met the love of my life, Joey, who suffers from the powerful disease of addiction.

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